NO HORIZON

 

No Horizon is the second of this trilogy made by the three artists on location on Folkestone beach as the tide comes in.

The artists start where they left off after their production, 'A Parable for Endeavour' the film made for SALT 2016. They continue their conversation verbally and visually as they create a new moving image piece for SALT 2018.

This time they are in Folkestone, making their way down the steps from Wear Bay Road. As the three figures stop to look out to sea, silhouetted against the light they are reminiscent of Anthony Gormley's figures from 'Another Time'. They then move off to occupy the space under Coronation Parade where one of Gormley's figures was placed during the Folkestone 2017 Triennial.

In contrast to Gormley's figures, which are intended to, "bear witness to what it is like to be alive and alone in space and time', the three female figures we see in the film are actually alive and together in space and time: they set to work, actively look and record and feel, risk their footing on the slippery mossed concrete and stone surfaces and measure their work against the speed of the incoming tide.

 

 

'My favourite shot was of the three women standing still, facing out to sea. Unselfconscious, authentic presentation without artifice but hugely artful because of it. A privilege to be allowed to experience your working methods and wonderful minds.'

 

'Thank you! Inspiring! Courage, hope and the struggle to find words and sense. Leaving enriched in body and soul.'

 

'A wonderful celebration of creativity, sisterhood, the power of the sea and nature” “I love this film - the beauty of it, the generosity of the collaboration, the sea, the horizon, things looking the same but different. So beautiful.'

'I wait at the end of the video "No Horizon" for the third woman, does she stay in the sea? 

It is a wonderful video! I am again deeply touched by your videos. Sadness is really not a disease, on the contrary, from my experience behind sadness is love, which you only feel when you go to the bottom of sadness, dive deep into the sea.

Each one of you women sees something of her own and gives what she sees a form of its own. On the one hand, it is so generous that there is this uniqueness in our world, on the other hand, I feel a great sadness that we are so separated from each other and each sees something different. In doing together, in "being there", "being present", this separation is dissolved again. I find that very comforting.

The vulnerability of the bodies next to the concrete walls and towards the sea shows the need to see the human body only as a temporary "dwelling place". I have a perceived presentiment, that human consciousness is like the sea and like heaven and now and then it is also concrete. The rigidity that is so easy to break, but inside humans are the sea and the sky. It’s a wonderful video!'
Esther Fritz